Pakistan Flood Damage

Fact Sheet

Source: US State Department

  • 20 million people directly affected
  • 61,776 square miles flooded
  • 1,248,704 homes damaged or destroyed
  • 402 Pakistani health facilities damaged or destroyed
  • 13,900 square miles of cropland damaged or destroyed

Background

Floods began on July 29, 2010. About 61,776 square miles (160,000 square kilometers) were flooded. By the end of August, over 20 million people were directly affected.

IMPACT

Shelter

The flooding had damaged or destroyed 1,248,704 homes by late August.

In the Punjab, 500,000 dwellings had been damaged or destroyed, 99 per cent of the housing in some flood-affected areas.

Agriculture

The floods have destroyed or damaged over 13,900 square miles (8.9 million acres/3.6 million hectares) of cropland, and about 80 per cent of crops in the affected areas. Cotton, maize, sugarcane and rice are the hardest hit crops. Over 450,000 draft animals had been killed by the floods, a number sure to grow. With inundated cropland and an estimated 661,400 tons of destroyed wheat seed, both farmers and national production face precarious prospects.

Health

As of the end of August, 402 health facilities in Pakistan are damaged or destroyed. Only 63 per cent of the requested support in the United Nations appeal is currently funded and items ranging from chlorine tablets to mosquito nets are in urgent need.

Infrastructure

Many main highways and roads throughout Pakistan are still submerged and bridges have been washed away, limiting access for aid delivery and needs assessments.

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    • AJ
    • September 10th, 2010

    Good work

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